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Background Noise, Episode 83: Darcy Yates by Matt Valerio

THE BACKGROUND NOISE PODCAST SERIES FOCUSES ON THE MUSIC THAT ARTISTS LISTEN TO WHEN THEY WORK, WHAT MUSIC INSPIRES THEM, OR JUST MUSIC THEY LIKE. THIS WEEK, IN EPISODE 83, the focus is on darcy yates

THE BACKGROUND NOISE PODCAST SERIES FOCUSES ON THE MUSIC THAT ARTISTS LISTEN TO WHEN THEY WORK, WHAT MUSIC INSPIRES THEM, OR JUST MUSIC THEY LIKE. THIS WEEK, IN EPISODE 83, the focus is on darcy yates

Bio:
Colorful swirls and bold imagery balances the still images of Darcy’s imagination. Her artwork embraces color and shape through vintage photography and playful characters. Darcy grew up in Los Angeles in the middle of the LA national forest. She finds herself growing with the bustling streets of her derelict town. Photographs are a dominate feature in most of her artwork because she love the raw emotion it conveys.  Darcy’s work is gritty, colorful and embodies the essence of soul and imagination. Her favorite tool is The Spirograph because of childish innocence it suggests. Her use of different media balances the stories that coincide with each piece. Her infatuation with unconventional interaction is explored through every piece she creates. 

What was your first concert?
Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons when they had their reunion tour! 

Last concert/show?
Kimbra at Space Jam in Silverlake 

First album you bought?
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was the first CD I ever bought on my own. It was right when CD’s became the new thing, I honestly hated them when they first came out. I grew up on my families record player and cassette tapes,  CD’s were super strange to me. When i saved enough money to purchase this “new” technology I decided to pick my favorite Beatles album. Sgt. Peppers still holds a special place in my heart. 

Last album you bought?
“Jesus Use Me” by Dorris and Sammy Ogg from my local thrift shop. The image on the album cover was way too special not to pass up. I actually used it as my main image for my show “ Day Destroy’s the Night”. Oh man, the music is horrible and the album is awful. The meaning, very questionable. But the name and face of the album is pure gold. I tried to listen to the entire album but just couldn’t. If there was a music burning pile this one would defiantly be the first to burn. Music can be inspirational and meaningful even if its horrible. 

Was there one record that made a significant impression on you?
I grew up constantly listening to music/musicals and many albums have changed my outlook on life… But the one that truly molded me was “The White Album” from The Beatles. I use to listen to this two part record over and over again because it made me feel alive. I have never felt so inspired and scared listening to these songs. I still can’t listen to Revolution no. 9 without tearing up ( it still scares the shit out of me!) Fear is a beautiful emotion that truly effects the way I create. This record gave me these emotions to explore my visions as an artist. Its an epic record that is the sound track to my life. 

Who is your musical hero?
This is way too hard to pick. So many amazing musicians,  this like having a mother pick their favorite child!  So… I’ll pick Janis Joplin… She opened so many door for musicians and will always be the soul/blues/ gospel queen.  She is  the voice to my screaming soul. 

How important is music to your creative process?
Before I start a piece I always think “ How do I feel, whats my mood, whats wrong, whats right? ”.  Music deeply inspires me and through my mood I pick songs that reflect my current state, it keeps me centered throughout my entire process and inspires most of my pieces. 

The Crystal Ship- The Doors
The Long and Winding Road- The Beatles
Chelsea Hotel No. 1 -Leonard Cohen
Without You-ODESZA  
Bungalow Bill- The Beatles White Album
CMYK -James Blake
Don’t Fear the Reaper- Blue Oyster Cult
Revolution No. 9 - The Beatles
Honey moon- Lana Del Rey
Summertime -Janis Joplin
Norwegian Wood - The Beatles
Brother Can You Spare A Dime- Spanky & Our gang
Plain Gold Ring (Live at Sing Sing Studios)- Kimbra
Mirror Maru- Cashmere Cat
She's Leaving Home-The Beatles

Check out Darcy's mix below, download it directly here, or subscribe to the Background Noise podcast on iTunes. Be sure to like Background Noise on Facebook for updates on future episodes. You can browse ALL the Background Noise episodes here. Check out Darcy's website for more of her work.

Background Noise, Episode 78: Clayton Brothers by Matt Valerio

THE BACKGROUND NOISE PODCAST SERIES FOCUSES ON THE MUSIC THAT ARTISTS LISTEN TO WHEN THEY WORK, WHAT MUSIC INSPIRES THEM, OR JUST MUSIC THEY LIKE. THIS WEEK, IN EPISODE 78, THE FOCUS IS ON CLAYTON BROTHERS.

THE BACKGROUND NOISE PODCAST SERIES FOCUSES ON THE MUSIC THAT ARTISTS LISTEN TO WHEN THEY WORK, WHAT MUSIC INSPIRES THEM, OR JUST MUSIC THEY LIKE. THIS WEEK, IN EPISODE 78, THE FOCUS IS ON CLAYTON BROTHERS.

Rob and Christian Clayton have collaborated on their artwork for years. Rarely working on the same canvas at the same time, the Pasadena, CA brotherly duo have perfected their psychedelic abstract art by taking turns, adding layer upon layer to what's in front of them.

It's not easy to say who does what, whether one painting is more Rob than Christian, or vice versa, but it is said that they both have very different styles. They do share inspiration though, often taking queues from local businesses and local regulars. Watch this great video of the two of them in a thrift store talking about some of these inspirational objects, sayings, etc.

You can learn more about the Clayton Brothers over at claytonbrothers.com.

What was your first concert?
CC: The Clash, Red Rocks Colorado
RC: My first concert was the Kamikazi Klones at the Rainbow music hall in Denver Co.

Last concert/show?
CC: Slim Cessna’s Auto Club
RC: The last show I went to was with Christian we saw a band from Denver Co. called
Slim Cessna’s Auto Club, two of the band members Daniel Grandbois and Todd Moore are childhood friends of ours. Slim Cessna’s Auto Club is a truly amazing group of talented musicians.

First album you bought?
CC: The Clash "Give em’ Enough Rope”
RC: Elvis Costello “ My Aim is True” 1977

Last album you bought?
RC: Morgan O’Kane “Pendulum”
CC: Bob Dylan "The Times They Are a-Changin"

Was there one record that made a significant impression on you?
CC: Tom Waits “Rain Dogs”
RC: I would have to say The Pogues “Rum, Sodomy And The Lash” Every song on this album is great!

Who is your musical hero?
CC: Nina Simone
RC: That would be Joe Strummer

How important is music to your creative process?
CC: When in full-working mode; I would say very important… I love listening to a variety of music when Im in the studio.
RC: I think a lot of the ideas that find their way into our paintings come from the eclectic music we play at the studio. We also make ambient noise recordings from around our neighborhood that we use in our installations.

1. Bob Log III - Six Stringer Kicker
2. The Damned - Dozen Girls
3. Daniel Johnston - Funeral Home
4. Doo Rag - John Henry
5. The Pogues - If I Should Fall From Grace With God
6. The Pogues - Navigator
7. Rocket From the Crypt - Ditch Digger
8. Slim Cessna’s Auto Club - Pine Box
9. The Clash - This Is England
10. Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds - Into My Arms

Check out Michael's mix below, download it directly here, or subscribe to the Background Noise podcast on iTunes. Be sure to like Background Noise on Facebook for updates on future episodes. You can browse ALL the Background Noise episodes here.

Background Noise, Episode 74: Danny Minnick by Matt Valerio

THE BACKGROUND NOISE PODCAST SERIES FOCUSES ON THE MUSIC THAT ARTISTS LISTEN TO WHEN THEY WORK, WHAT MUSIC INSPIRES THEM, OR JUST MUSIC THEY LIKE. THIS WEEK, IN EPISODE 74, THE FOCUS IS ON ARTIST DANNY MINNICK

THE BACKGROUND NOISE PODCAST SERIES FOCUSES ON THE MUSIC THAT ARTISTS LISTEN TO WHEN THEY WORK, WHAT MUSIC INSPIRES THEM, OR JUST MUSIC THEY LIKE. THIS WEEK, IN EPISODE 74, THE FOCUS IS ON ARTIST DANNY MINNICK

Danny Minnick does it all. Not only is he a well-respected artist in the Los Angeles art scene, he is also a professional skateboarder and actor who has appeared in films by everyone from Gus Van Sant to Marcus Raboy and Larry Clark. You can catch him in 2016's The Brits Are Coming, starring Crispin Glover, Uma Thurman, Sofia Vergara, Parker Posey, Tim Roth and others.

His art sometimes resembles the manic, stream-of-consciousness paintings of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Whatever is going on in Danny's mind at that moment ends up splattered on the canvas. Sometimes it's simple, sometimes it's chaotic. He's a man who must create. His work resides in the private collections of Mena Suvari, Nick Cassavetes and Fred Durst, among others.

 

First album you bought?
Winifred Atwell . From a thrift store

Last album you bought?
Velvet Underground - Fully Loaded

First concert?
That I can remember .. NIRVANA AT THE OK HOTEL

Last concert?
Joseph Arthur

Was there one album that made a significant impression on you?
Led Zeppelin Houses of the Holy

Who is your musical hero?
Jimi Hendrix

How important is music to your creative process?
Very important .. It feeds Me.. 

Brian Eno - Baby's on Fire
WInifred Atwell - Poor People of Paris
Jimi Hendrix - Machine Gun
The Velvet Underground - Oh Sweet Nuthin
London Grammar - If You Wait
Bob Dylan - It's All Over Now Baby Blue
Miles Davis - Whispering
The Beatles - Dig a Pony
Rolling Stones - Emotional Rescue
The Animals - Hey Gyp
The Cry - Twist of Faith
Nirvana - Oh, Me
Lana Del Ray - Florida Kilos
Coldplay - Amsterdam
Courtney Barnett - Anonymous Club

Check out Danny's mix below, download it directly here, or subscribe to the Background Noise podcast on iTunes. Be sure to like Background Noise on Facebook for updates on future episodes. You can browse ALL the Background Noise episodes here.  Check out Danny's website here.

Background Noise, Episode 71: Shark Toof by Matt Valerio

THE BACKGROUND NOISE PODCAST SERIES FOCUSES ON THE MUSIC THAT ARTISTS LISTEN TO WHEN THEY WORK, WHAT MUSIC INSPIRES THEM, OR JUST MUSIC THEY LIKE. THIS WEEK, IN EPISODE 71, the focus is on artist shark toof

THE BACKGROUND NOISE PODCAST SERIES FOCUSES ON THE MUSIC THAT ARTISTS LISTEN TO WHEN THEY WORK, WHAT MUSIC INSPIRES THEM, OR JUST MUSIC THEY LIKE. THIS WEEK, IN EPISODE 71, the focus is on artist shark toof

Shark Toof has been a fixture in the Los Angeles street art scene for years now. His iconic shark wheat pastes, which featured "TOOF" strategically placed in the negative space left from rows of shark teeth, were commonplace throughout the streets of many cities, from Los Angeles to New Hampshire. And his gallery art, much more detailed and thought out, continues to wow art collectors worldwide

He has worked closely with PangeaSeed, a Hawaii-based non-profit organization that helps educate and raise awareness about the importance of shark conservation and preserving ocean habitats. PangeaSeed even helped coordinate a shark dive for him so he could better connect with the sharks and the ocean life.

In addition to his website, his work can be seen at the Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles, where his work is part of their permanent collection. He also has two 100 foot murals located in Miami and Los Angeles. The latter of which recently had a preservation fundraiser to keep it visible.

What was your first concert?
New Order or Jesus And Mary Chain, but The LA Dream Team played a lunch time
show at my middle school.  Does that count?

Last concert/show?
The Make Up

First album, tape or cd you bought?
New Order - Substance

Last album you bought?
It's been so long I can't remember.
Either The Wedding Present or Casiotone For The Painfully Alone

Was there any album that made a significant impression on you?
Jane's Addiction -  Nothing's Shocking

Who is your musical hero?
Robert Smith

How important do you think music is to your creative process?
Music is important to my living process.

1975 JAWS THEME SONG
Summertime Rolls - JANE’S ADDICTION
Dance Yrself Clean - LCD SOUNDSYSTEM
Corduroy - THE WEDDING PRESENT
Vapour Trail - RIDE
We Can't Be Contained - THE MAKE UP
Sunshine Smile - ADORABLE
Star Sail - THE VERVE
So What - MINISTRY
I Luv The Valley Oh - XIU XIU
The Fire In Which You Burn Slow - INDELIBLE MCS
Summer Babe - PAVEMENT
2 Kindsa Love - JON SPENCER BLUES EXPLOSION
Birthday (Christmas Eve Christmas Day Remix) ( with Jesus and Mary Chain) - SUGAR CUBES
1969 - THE STOOGES
Ladies And Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space - SPIRITUALIZED
Mersey Paradise - STONE ROSES
Just Like Honey - JESUS AND MARY CHAIN
Looking At You - MC5
If You're Feeling Sinister - BELLE AND SEBASTIAN
Little Yellow Spider -DEVENDRA BANHART
Thirteen (Demo Version) - FORWARD RUSSIA
Between Us and Them - MOVING UNITS
Do They Owe Us A Living - CRASS
In My Eyes - MINOR THREAT
Plainsong - THE CURE
Ceremony - NEW ORDER
Disorder - JOY DIVISION
Sheep - GONJASUFI
El Camino - ZACKEY FORCE FUNK

Check out Shark Toof's mix below, download it directly here, or subscribe to the Background Noise podcast on iTunes. Be sure to like Background Noise on Facebook for updates on future episodes. You can browse ALL the Background Noise episodes here.  Check out Shark Toof's website here.

Background Noise, Episode 70: Morley by Matt Valerio

Los Angeles street artist Morley likes to break up the monotony of everyday routines. He uses witty black and white wheat pastes, often put up strategically based on their surroundings, to provoke thoughts and inject humor when it is needed most.

He uses these wheat pastes to put his own internal thoughts out into the world. Thoughts that he knows others out there can relate to. "Oh Alarm Clock, You Have No Idea What I Can Do With Nine More Minutes," or "I Love You Because We Hate The Same Stuff." They're all quick little reminders not to take ourselves too seriously. Reminders that it's ok to have a little chuckle on your way into work or your way home after a long day.

The art world needs more people who don't take themselves too seriously.

What was the first album you bought?
TAPE: The Pretty Woman Soundtrack. In my defense, my parents had pretty good music taste- so I didn’t need to buy any albums by The Beatles or Tom Waits as they already had them and played them in the house. But I got an infection from hearing the song “The King of Wishful Thinking” by Go West and it was beyond my control. Plus I was 8 years old, so give me a break.

CD: Naughty By Nature’s “19Naughty3.” I wish I could redeem myself with this being better than my first cassette tape, but sadly I cannot. This time you don’t have to give me a break- by 11 I should have known better!

What was the last album you bought?
“Another Eternity” by Purity Ring. It’s pretty good. I got the cover album of Elliott Smith tunes by one of the Avett Brothers on the same day. They’re decent covers for sure but there really is something uniquely magical about Elliott Smith that just can’t be recaptured. I think the attempt was a respectful homage, but on a purely sonic level, any cover of his will always be missing something.

What was your first concert?
White Zombie. It was the “Astro Creep 2000” tour, though- to be honest I went because I had a friend who was really into them and I was more of a fan of the opening band, The Toadies. Looking back, it’s kind of a strange pairing, musically. I still love that first Toadies record, “Rubberneck.” It’s pretty underrated as far as ‘90s post-grunge albums go.

What was your last concert?
Stars at the Henry Fonda Theater in Los Angeles. The band KILLED it and it’s a really great venue. I had seen Built to Spill there right before they broke up. There’s not a bad spot to stand in the house and it’s not obnoxiously large. I don’t bother seeing bands if they outgrow places like The Fonda or the El Rey. I just don’t feel a connection with the band if the venue is huge and overflowing with people.

Was there one album that made a significant impression on you?
“The Blue Album” by Weezer was a monumentally important record for me. After outgrowing “Hip-Hop Hooray” just in time for Nirvana to abruptly end, I found myself searching for a band that I felt represented who I was. At 12-years-old, you really want a band that will be the bones that you can build an identity around. You take your fashion cues from them, your sense of romance, rebellion and swagger. As much as I would have liked to relate to Kurt Cobain or Eddie Vedder, they just seemed too handsome and mythic. Instead, I gravitated to Rivers Cuomo. He sang about seeking refuge in his garage and playing Dungeons and Dragons. It was like he was singing just to me! In a time of somewhat dour music, Weezer seemed happy with who they were. They weren’t ashamed of their nerd status, they wore it as a badge of honor. This was incredibly empowering at a time when I really needed it. Even though the band has since evolved in a direction that I don’t dig, I still wear the same horn rimmed style glasses that Rivers’ sports and take it as a compliment when people say we look alike.

Who is your musical hero?
My all-time biggest musical influence has to be Beatles-era Paul McCartney. I’m a bit of a Beatles nut and in studying their influence, I’m fascinated with how much they altered pop culture and the musical landscape. It’s mind boggling. I saw him play in Dodger Stadium last summer (breaking my “only small and medium sized venue” rule) and it was honestly magnificent. That’s a pretty big word but for me, it’s appropriate. My wife and I had crappy seats but just to hear some of my favorite songs sung by the man who wrote them. I mean- I got to hear “Hey Jude” live! It was a bucket list moment for sure.

How important is music to your creative process?
It’s vital for me. I always say that if my work seems like lyrics to a song you like, then I’ve done a good job. Music is really how I grease the wheels of creativity. I have to have something playing any time I work or create. Silence just feels like a brick wall. When I was developing the idea for what I wanted my work to become, I looked to music because unlike a lot of methods of creative expression, there is a more profound relationship formed between the musician and the audience. You can look at a beautiful painting without forming a connection to the artist because the artist isn’t really part of it. Ditto with film and photography. You can feel a connection to an author but it’s still removed from hearing an artist sing directly in your ears. With music, a 12 year old boy in Iowa can listen to Weezer and finally feel like he’s not alone in this world. I wanted the people that saw my work to feel that same connection. I wanted them to feel like it was someONE, not just someTHING talking to them. This is why I include a drawing of myself in all of my work, to try and realize that connection between two humans and remind those who might see what I do and relate to it, that none of us are alone, and hope is not lost when there’s someone to help you back up, even if that help is just a few words pasted on wall.

 

1. “Life of the Party” - Longwave
2. “Sax Rohmer #1” - The Mountain Goats
3. “The Song In My Heart” - Gomez
4. “Beautiful Beat” - Nada Surf
5. “Scenic Pastures” - Archers of Loaf
6. “Bad Reputation” - Freedy Johnston
7. “That’s How Strong My Love is” - Otis Redding
8. “I Should Have Known Better” - The Beatles
9. “Car” - Built to Spill
10. “To All My Friends” - Atmosphere
11. “'Til I Get There” - Lupe Fiasco
12. “Losers” - The Belle Brigade
13. “(This Is) The Dream of Evan and Chan” - Dntel
14. “Eat, Sleep, Repeat” - Copeland
15. “Every Stone” - Manchester Orchestra
16. “Your Hand In Mine” - Explosions in the Sky
17. “Not Miserable” - Frightened Rabbit
18. “The Tracks of My Tears” - Smokey Robinson and the Miracles
19. “Nowhere We Cannot Go” - Hayden
20. “Place To Be” - Nick Drake
21. “Heartbeats (The Knife cover)” - Jose Gonzalez
22. “To Sing For You” - Donovan
23. “Murder In The City” - The Avett Brothers
24. “Grizzlies” - Jim & Sam
25. “England” - The National

Check out Morley's mix below, download it directly here, or subscribe to the Background Noise podcast on iTunes. Be sure to like Background Noise on Facebook for updates on future episodes. You can browse ALL the Background Noise episodes here.  Check out Morley's website here.

X - "Nausea" by Matt Bomarr

x - "nausea" (download) [audio http://www.divshare.com/direct/15143348-8de.mp3]

I watched the Germs biopic What We Do Is Secret last week. I wasn't expecting much going in, but I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed it. In the movie, you could hear this song playing in the background, and it reminded me how much I liked it, so here it is. Probably the best track from X's classic 1980 release Los Angeles. buy