funny

My New Obsession: Same Picture of Michael Cera by Matt Valerio

This new Instagram account showed up on my radar today. The account keeps it plain and simple. The same photo of Michael Cera, over...and over....and over...and over. 302 posts and counting as of this very moment, and over 2 thousand followers. Internet, you never cease to amaze me. 

Follow @samepictureofmichaelcera

Background Noise, Episode 23: Hanksy by Matt Valerio

The "Background Noise" podcast series focuses on the music that artists listen to when they work, what music inspires them, or just music they like. This week, in Episode 23, the focus is New York artist  Hanksy .

The "Background Noise" podcast series focuses on the music that artists listen to when they work, what music inspires them, or just music they like. This week, in Episode 23, the focus is New York artist Hanksy.

"Catch Me If You Can" (photo by Matt Bomarr)

I'm a sucker for a good pun. I often make them myself, and now that I'm a dad, I can REALLY get away with them (or at least I'd like to think). While I consider myself pretty good, I have to bow and acknowledge that New York artist Hanksy is the master. Just look at the image above. Marty McFly, get it? Of course you do. It's brilliant. And it doesn't stop there.

Hanksy first started getting attention when his Tom Hanks-themed wheat pasted Banksy parodies started popping up around NYC and other cities. All of them featuring recognizable Banksy imagery, but with the Academy Award-winning actors face added in.

"Human 50 Centipede"

He has since moved on from the Banksy stuff and has been doing his own original pun-tastic pieces all over the country, gathering a fair amount of continued attention in the process. After all, his work constantly has the potential to go viral due to its pop culture familiarity, the tongue-in-cheek humor to it all, and the roll-your-eyes "oh god" punny-ness. Fairly recently, one of his images started making the rounds on Reddit. An image depicting rapper 50 Cent, actually, multiple 50 cents, all strung together Human Centipede-style. The name of the piece? You guessed it, "Human 50 Centipede". Another one that popped up in the Lower East Side last year featured the late James Gandolfini merged with Gandalf from Lord of the Rings for "Gandalfini". I seriously could go on forever with these. Love him or hate him, the guy has wit. See for yourself in the gallery below.

Hanksy's wit has even been acknowledged by Stephen Colbert. Last October, when Banksy conducted his "Better Out than In" on the streets of New York, Colbert called on Banksy to use a wall on the outside of the Colbert Report studio as a canvas for one of his pieces (actually, he sarcastically "forbade" Banksy from doing art on the wall) . Not one to be baited, Banksy did not oblige, but Hanksy wasted no time and hopped on this opportunity. The next morning, a wheat pasted bear with Stephen's head appeared on the wall outside the show. The name of the piece was "Colbear", and Colbert loved it. He devoted about 5-minutes on his show to talking about Hanksy.

Hanksy also curated January's 2-hour guerrilla art show "Surplus Candy" in an abandoned house in Alphabet City. An event I attended with a couple of friends, and have mentioned in numerous Background Noise blog posts, due to the fact that many of the artists I've featured in the series were also part of this one-of-a-kind show. Once again, a short video that sums up the entire event can be seen here.

He put together possibly the longest mix in the series so far. Clocking in at 1 hour 47 minutes, the mix gets started right out of the gate with Miley Cyrus and jumps right into Japanther. Operation Ivy to Pharrell Williams. It covers the whole spectrum. I'm happy to have Hanksy contribute to this series.

What was the first concert you went to?

Thanks to various huffing incidents, my childhood memory is fairly foggy. But I'm fairly certain it was one of the first Warped Tours. Rancid and Bad Religion played and I was 15 and I was super fucking stoked. 
 
What was the last concert/show you went to?

The So So Glos at the great Shea Stadium.

First lp/tape or cd?

The first couple cassettes I purchased with my own money was Green Day's Dookie along with the soundtrack from the movie Newsies. Seize the day, yo. 

Last album you bought?

I've got a fairly good amount of friends in the music biz, so I try to cop their new releases as often as possible. Yesterday I picked up "Back in Black" by Chicago's Archie Powell and the Exports. It's great. 

Is there one record that made a significant impression on you?

Energy by Operation Ivy. It's the one album I will forever return to. Again and again it never ceases to bore me. 

Who is your musical hero?

Bob Dylan. 

How important do you think music is to your creative process?

Unlike some creative types who can work in silence, swimming in their own thoughts, I can't. I fucking drown without some sort of noise. For me silence can be suffocating so I make damn sure I have some playlist cued up and ready to go whenever I'm working in my studio. 

 

Check out his mix below. download it here, or subscribe to the Background Noise podcast on iTunes. And don't forget to like Background Noise on Facebook for updates on future episodes.

Background Noise, Episode 22: Eric Yahnker by Matt Valerio

The "Background Noise" podcast series focuses on the music that artists listen to when they work, what music inspires them, or just music they like. This week, in Episode 22, the focus is California artist    Eric Yahnker .

The "Background Noise" podcast series focuses on the music that artists listen to when they work, what music inspires them, or just music they like. This week, in Episode 22, the focus is California artist Eric Yahnker.

California-based artist Eric Yahnker has a knack for creating absurd, yet humorous imagery out of the most basic and unpredictable subject matter. A lot of his work has that "damn, I wish I thought of that" feel to it. For example, his "Star of David Lee Roth" piece, featuring a blue triangle and one of Eric's signature colored pencil and graphite drawings depicting David Lee Roth making up the rest of the Star of David. Some pieces from his brand new "Sticks and Drones" exhibit at Paradise Row in London show that Eric is on top of his current events. He has a detailed, hand-drawn portrait of Vladimir Putin with a blue Crimea-shaped tear dripping from his eye with the title "Crimea River". Or his "Wrecking Ball" piece, which depicts Barack Obama looking out the window of the Oval Office, watching Miley Cyrus swinging on a wrecking ball. It's all simple, yet amazing. I could look at his work for days.

His sense of humor comes as no surprise, considering his past experience in the comedy world. He worked on the storyboard for South Park: Bigger, Longer, Uncut, and drew and directed a series of animated bonus features for a few seasons of Seinfeld DVDs called "Seinimation", some of which can be found on YouTube.

I was absolutely fascinated to see what songs Eric would choose, and he came through with an impressive mix of smooth 60s/70s R&B. Click through the gallery below for an additional glimpse at some of his work, read the brief Q+A below, followed by Eric's mix.

What was your first concert?
The first concert I remember hitting without an adult chaperone was Lenny Kravitz feat. Slash...must've been circa 1990.


Last concert/show?
I see my buds play small local venues just about every week, but the last major show I went to was either Sade @ Staples Center or Men of Soul: feat. Jeffrey Osborne, Freddie Jackson, & Peabo Bryson @ The Hollywood Bowl.


First album, tape or cd you bought?
My first 45RPM was Stevie Wonder's "I Just Called To Say I Love You."  My first cassette was Paul McCartney's "Pipes of Peace," because it had "Say, Say, Say" on it.  My first CD was The Beatles "Rubber Soul."


Last album you bought?
DJ Rogers, "It's Good To Be Alive"


Was there any album that made a significant impression on you?
There were several albums throughout my formative years that blew my young mind.  During some particularly sensitive periods, my parents assumed I was gay:
Beastie Boys, "License To Ill"
Guns n' Roses, "Appetite For Destruction" 
George Michael, "Listen Without Prejudice"
Fiona Apple, "Tidal"
Jeff Buckley, "Grace"
Marvin Gaye, "Here, My Dear"
Maxwell, "Urban Hang Suite"


Who is your musical hero?
Quincy Jones + Michael Jackson, together.


How important do you think music is to your creative process?
Music is pretty necessary to help me zone out while I draw, but since I can't focus on two things at once, I usually have to turn it off when brainstorming or beating off.

Check out Eric's website, stream his mix below, download it here, or subscribe to the Background Noise podcast on iTunes. And don't forget to like Background Noise on Facebook for updates on future episodes.


Background Noise, Episode 20: Wizard Skull by Matt Bomarr

The "Background Noise" podcast series focuses on the music that artists listen to when they work, what music inspires them, or just music they like. This week, in Episode 20, the focus is on Brooklyn's  Wizard Skull .

The "Background Noise" podcast series focuses on the music that artists listen to when they work, what music inspires them, or just music they like. This week, in Episode 20, the focus is on Brooklyn's Wizard Skull.

There's no concept or juxtaposition of two pop culture icons that is too weird for Brooklyn-based artist Wizard Skull. Not only does the man also known as Alex Duke have one of the most epic beards in Brooklyn, he has an incredible knack for making you laugh and feel uncomfortable with his drawings.

Some of these concepts include: Kanye West as a duck, Rick Ross as Robocop, Slimer and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man as muscle men, rappers holding their cats (the subject of his handmade "Pussy" zine), or even 2Pac and Biggie in a shirtless embrace (for his "Sex Daze" trading card series for MIshka). Not only have these images been wheatpasted all over the city, shown in galleries, or sold as prints, they've also shown up on a series of skateboards he designed for Death Skateboards. He's quite prolific, and always up on his current events.

Transient

He was yet another one of the great artists who contributed to the recent Surplus Candy show, one of the pieces, pasted to the inside of a toilet seat, featured Charlie Brown with a squiggly penis to match his squiggly shirt. And most recently, he and our mutual friend Killer Acid organized Zine Friends, a zine fair that took place at Brooklyn's Cotton Candy Machine.

Transient

I feel like I can't even keep up with the number of zines that he produces. If I could afford it, I'd buy them all. If you think YOU can keep up, you should keep an eye on his online shop, or follow him on Instagram.

What was your first concert?

My first concert was Conor Oberst and The Mystic Valley Band. Other than that, I never had much interest in going to see bands live, but I went to a lot of local band shows with friends just for something to do.
 
What was the last concert you went to?

The last concert I went to was at Bowery Ballroom. I don't know the name of the band. I only went because friends wanted to.

Transient

What was the first album you bought?

I forget what the first music I bought was, but it was probably something I wouldn't be interested in listening to now.

What was the last album you bought?

The last album I bought was Devendra Banhart's Mala. It was alright.

Is there one album that made a significant impression on you?

The album that made a significant impression on me would be Wu Tang's new album. I haven't heard it and have little interest in hearing it,but they are releasing only one copy, which significantly impresses me.

Who is your musical hero?

Transient

There's no way someone could be my hero for playing music. I don't know anything about the people who make the music I like, I just enjoy their music. Aren't hero's supposed to do something heroic? I guess I'd pick the people who sang the "We are the world" song, I forget what that was for, but I think it was a benefit or to bring awareness to something. So I guess that's heroic..

How important is music to your creative process?

Music is important to my creative process because I draw a lot in coffee shops and there are always really annoying conversations happening near me, so if there is music on, it helps drown out the sound of those conversations, and keeps them from distracting me.


Check out Wizard Skull's mix below, download it here, or subscribe to the Background Noise podcast on iTunes.

Be sure to check out Wizard Skull on Facebook, and don't forget to like Background Noise on Facebook as well, for updates on future episodes.

Background Noise, Episode 11: Spring Break by Matt Bomarr

My new "Background Noise" podcast series focuses on the music that artists listen to when they work, what music inspires them, or just music they like. This week, in Episode 11, the focus is on  Spring Break

My new "Background Noise" podcast series focuses on the music that artists listen to when they work, what music inspires them, or just music they like. This week, in Episode 11, the focus is on Spring Break

photo via Spring Break / Bad Dad

photo via Spring Break / Bad Dad

Spring Break, as an artist, doesn't really have a name. He's just a guy that created something that exists to make you smile. One of those things that you see on your way home from a long day at work that makes you chuckle to yourself. Just two elongated, "drippy" tits staring right at you with the words "Spring Break" underneath. Toilet humor at its finest, brought to the streets of the world. From Seattle to NYC, all the way to Prague. He's everywhere.

I wanted to bring attention to his work because it's something that has fascinated me for a few years now. Initially, I thought it was just a random scrawl that someone did once on a wall in midtown Manhattan, until I started seeing it more and more, soon realizing it was kind of a "thing". I started exploring online and found more and more pictures on Flickr in so many locations throughout the world. My fascination only grew from there, when I started trying to figure out who would come up with something like this. I'm not going to try to look too deep into this. Bottom line, I find it funny, that's all.

photo by Objectivejay

photo by Objectivejay

Astronautalis / Bad Dad (photo by Bomarr)

Astronautalis / Bad Dad (photo by Bomarr)

A new layer of the Spring Break onion was peeled back a year or two ago when talking with my friend Andy / Astronautalis, who had corresponded with Spring Break and had acquired a shirt featuring his alter-ego "Bad Dad". I was already intrigued by the shirt because for years I have worn a shirt that just says "ONE BAD DAD" in white block letters, so when I noticed that Andy was wearing a shirt that said "Bad Dad", I had to find out where he got it. When he informed me that it was done by the same guy who did the Spring Break tags, my brain exploded. It turns out, he's also hit numerous places with this tag as well. Just a simple face, sort of reminiscent of Carl from Aqua Teen Hunger Force. Moustachioed and white trashy, with the words Bad Dad next to it. It's not fine art, but I love it. Simple, to the point, and it doesn't take itself too seriously.

He's a man of few words, but he loves himself some music. He provided this short, but incredibly sweet (for the most part) mix of some of his favorites.

"Hot sauce" drawing given to me by Spring Break

"Hot sauce" drawing given to me by Spring Break

What was your first concert?
uhmmmm.... Maybe goo goo dolls when I was 11


Last concert?
I play in a band, but besides that I snuck in to see built to spill. 

 

First record?
i think it was nirvana, Nevermind 

 

Last album you bought?
Chrissy zebi tembo rerelease on Mississippi records

 

Impressionable record:
all nirvana records and green day Dookie 


How important do you feel music is to your creative process?
I listen to music all damn day. I like listening to sad music because it's like real beauty ya know. You cry, you smile, you get a little angry. It's got all the human emotions and I feel like artists make their best art as well as music when they're depressed or melancholy 

Listen to Spring Break's podcast below, download here, or subscribe to the Background Noise podcast on iTunes.

Oh, and check him out on the Instagram.